Try Again, Fail Again, Fail Better

In the past couple of weeks, this quote has been on my mind often:

evertried

Being a writer, (or doing anything worthwhile and challenging), means that failure is inevitable. As I write the ninth version of Chapter One, it’s likely that I’ll add another notch to my failure belt. The thought of getting it wrong for a ninth time is a little unnerving and sometimes it feels like I’m running out space for notches.

And yet, this is exactly what needs to happen. Each time I fail, I improve as a writer. I learn something about the art that I didn’t know a day before, and my story is better for it.

So keep failing. Fail again and again. Getting better is worth it.

Hello Blogosphere! I’m Back…

I’ve been terrible at updating this blog and I apologize to those of you who would have liked more frequent posts. There was a particular subject I wanted to touch upon but, because I never figured out how to quite say it, I didn’t get around to blogging at all. That subject will be covered next January—it deserves a bit more time and attention than I can give it now.

In the meantime, I have been writing and causing as much chaos as I can.

After stepping away from The Dark Matter Chronicles series to work on another project, I’ve decided to return to my first book for a bit of polishing.  While it was tough to walk away from the universe of the Arcana, time and space was just what I needed to get some perspective on my priorities. I think it will help make Volume 2 in the series better.

So, I’ll leave you now with a thought on priorities, and a promise that the next blog post will be up sooner rather than later.

 

pic

By mxkremzen

Antagonists are Protagonists Too

Since I released Dark Rising to beta-readers back in September, I’ve gotten bits and pieces of feedback from those of you who picked up a copy. The one thing I keep hearing is how surprised everyone is that so much of the book is dedicated to Psi (the villain).

Most of the Young Adult books I’ve read focus on the hero and the challenges that he or she faces, but that didn’t seem like the right approach for me. I knew that it was really important to showcase the villain and give him just as much room in the story as my hero, Alexander, was given. I would go as far as to say that the first book of The Dark Matter Chronicles is more so about Psi than Alexander.

Why did I set up the book this way?

I believe that it is crucial to treat antagonists and all secondary characters as having just as much value as the protagonist. They are no less important and they’re certainly not meant to be plot devices or accessories for the main character.

The world doesn’t revolve around any one person, but each and every one of us is the protagonist in our own story. We don’t think of ourselves as existing only for someone else’s benefit. And that truth should be kept in mind when it comes to stories as well because if those characters were real people, then they would never consider themselves to be secondary characters–or even antagonists–in other peoples’ lives. No villain (real or fictional) thinks of him or herself as a villain.  Good versus evil isn’t that straightforward. I think the upcoming Wreck-it-Ralph does a good job of showing that, but in a much cuter and fluffier way than Dark Rising does.

From Psi’s perspective, he is the protagonist. He’s the hero. The Dark Matter Chronicles wouldn’t be a truthful story if I didn’t acknowledge that. And though you’ll get to know Alexander more in the second book, (I’m working on it, I swear), you’ll also get to see Psi’s evolution, along with that of Ezilie’s, Charon’s, and James’s, too.

So the next time you find yourself thinking of about how much you hate the bad guys in books, remember that just like Wreck-it-Ralph and Psi, bad guys are people too.

An Ode to Superheroes

I have always loved superheroes. Always. I remember waking up on Saturday mornings or rushing home every day after school just so I could park myself in front of the T.V. I rarely missed an episode of Spider-man or the X-men as they battled their foes. I even watched the old-school, live-action version of Batman with Adam West. As I grew up, I never lost that love. I still watch every superhero movie when it comes out and think about them often. I’ll be the first person in line when The Guardians of the Galaxy movie comes out. I would even tell you about the dream where I lived out my own episode of Doctor Who if I wasn’t thwarted by the evil that is my alarm clock and its dream-erasing abilities.

In the past I’ve written a blog post titled Why We Love Superheroes, but I never explained why comic book lore is so important to me. I turned to superheroes because I needed them. I can still recall an incident when I was six years old and my superheroes served me well. After a day of being teased at school, back when I hadn’t made a single friend, I headed home, bundled up in a new blue snow suit. It was my first Canadian winter and I wasn’t used to wearing so many layers. I looked like the clumsy Smurf cousin of the Pillsbury doughboy. It was also the first time I fell into a small, icy ditch, (and yes, that’s happened more often than I’d like to admit).

All the layers I wore acted as a cushion but it didn’t keep my bare face from smashing against the ice. I hit the ground, right cheek first. Stunned, I tried to get up but the ground so slippery that each time I found my legs, I fell again. Aside from the actual fall and the bruise that covered my face for a good two weeks after, what I remember the most about that incident was that I didn’t cry. I didn’t fall apart or give up. Instead, I just kept trying to stand up and crawl out of that ditch.

Why? Because Spider-man didn’t cry. Batman wouldn’t stay down after he took a hit. The X-men didn’t give up in the face of adversity. And I wanted to be like my heroes.

Superheroes are our modern-day incarnates of ancient myths. They inspire us to rise above our limits and circumstances in order to become something greater. They teach us to believe that through our actions, we can change the world. They are role models that show us that integrity and morality are a choice, and that the choice can be a difficult one that often comes at cost. And most importantly, they reflect the best in us — our strengths and our vulnerabilities.

As I’ve gotten older, my definition of the word ‘hero’ has evolved. It’s no longer limited to those who can fly and crawl up walls. Many of my current heroes have no superpowers. But they’ve taught me that showing courage, providing inspiration, persevering, and being compassionate are the kind of superpowers that can be greater than invisibility and superhuman strength. Writers like Stan Lee and J.K. Rowling gave me worlds to disappear into when the reality I lived in crumbled. I once had a teacher who made me stand up and answer questions until I learned to speak up for myself and another who told me that I could do anything I wanted. The former gave me a voice, the latter changed my life. During my toughest times, I have also been able to turn to great friends. When it comes to finding good ones, I have been uncommonly lucky.

As I prepare to prepare to head into the publishing world with my book series, The Dark Matter Chronicles, I’ve turned to my superheroes once again. Through my characters, I get to live out my hopes and fears on blank pages. And I’m not at all surprised that when I made the choice to be a writer, I created a world where superheroes exist but still struggle to find their place.

While I try to find my place in this world, I’ve encountered a lot of people who have told me to put away the kind of dreams and fantasies that are often associated with childhood. You can’t build a life imagining superheroes, they said. I know now that they were wrong. I’m glad I was too childish to listen. They are welcome to become proper grown-ups if that’s what suits them. I prefer to be that six-year-old kid who got back up thanks to a team of caped crusaders.

The Higgs, The Guardians of the Galaxy, and Real Life DRAGONS

The past couple of weeks have been incredibly hectic for me, so I apologize for not posting something new earlier. But let’s recap what’s happened lately, shall we?

First, the physicists at CERN confirmed the existence of the Higgs Boson, (aka The God Particle). A lot of people will argue that the discovery makes no real difference. I am not one of those people. The announcement of the discovery was long anticipated and with it, our understanding of the world is more complete. You know what that leads to? More high-tech gadgets for you and me! If you’re unsure about what the Higgs is, then watch this:

Second, this past week was one of the biggest in the comic world with the San Diego Comic-Con in full swing. I’ve never been to the convention, but it is definitely on my bucket-list. Aside from the Game of Thrones panel, (which could have been better), the most interesting showcase this year had to be from Marvel. The comic book giant confirmed that a Guardians of the Galaxy movie will arrive in 2014. For anyone who doesn’t know, Guardians of the Galaxy is like Avengers in space. IN SPACE, PEOPLE! Given that it shares themes with my own book, The Dark Matter Chronicles, I am terribly excited for this to come out. Like, a kid who has eaten 3 pixie sticks and then washed it all down with a jug of kool-aid excited.

Guardians Of The Galaxy Marvel

And last but not least, I’ve recently learned that scientists in Indonesia discovered what appears to be a tiny dragon. That’s right. Tiny dragon. There is no confirmation on whether or not it breathes fire, guards wizarding banks, or answers to a Khaleesi. If we’re being realistic though, it’s actually a species of gliding lizard. But screw reality! I’m counting on evolution to be awesome and turn them into the badasses they are in books and movies. Sooner rather than later please. Thanks science!

Will Our Kids Be a New Species?

I think I might have to start a “Ted Videos I’m Obsessed With” series on my blog because I’ve found another presentation that’s really exciting.

Evolutionary biology has always been a favorite subject of mine and has definitely influenced my work. In this video, Juan Enriquez talks about how different species of humans co-existed in the past, and how we might be evolving along different paths in the present.

I highly recommend this video for anyone who is interested in sci-fi, fantasy, and those who occasionally like having their minds blown.

Batmobile and GoT Pics: It’s Good To Be A Nerd In My Neighborhood

In the past couple of weeks, I’ve some seen some pretty cool things around my neighborhood.

First, the batmobile was parked unattended and I happened to catch a glimpse. I can only assume Batman was close by, but we all know he’s a master of stealth and hiding.

Second, a barista at Starbucks drew this ode to Game of Thrones on the advertising board outside the coffee-house. I don’t know who created this awesomeness but that person deserves a raise, damn-it!

Well done, neighborhood. Well Done.

The Great Rules of Writing

As a writer, I think it’s important to work on your craft and strive to get better at it. I’ve learned a lot through the act of writing itself but sometimes it’s helpful to come across a list of rules like this:

Do not put statements in the negative form.
And don’t start sentences with a conjunction.
If you reread your work, you will find on rereading that a
great deal of repetition can be avoided by rereading and editing.
Never use a long word when a diminutive one will do.
Unqualified superlatives are the worst of all.
De-accession euphemisms.
If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is.
Avoid trendy locutions that sound flaky.
Last, but not least, avoid clichés like the plague.
~William Safire, “Great Rules of Writing”

If you don’t stumble upon these ‘rules’ somewhere, it’s likely you’ll discover them on your own. So far, I’ve found that they apply pretty consistently. The trick, of course, is to master the rules and then learn when to break them.

New Dark Matter Chronicles Summary

For the past couple of weeks, I have been tweaking the summary of The Dark Matter Chronicles, while slowly losing bits and pieces of my sanity. Turns out that I can spend hours obsessing over a single line. The new version is now posted under the ‘About the Book’ tab located above. Please take a look and let me know what you think. If you tell me it needs work, I’ll probably imagine ways of exacting revenge at first but will appreciate the feedback in the end.

In the meantime, Spongebob will express how eager and excited I am to share this new summary on my behalf. Gaze upon its madness and cringe!

The Importance of Failure

At some point you’re going to fail. It’s inevitable, especially if you’re a writer.  It’s what you do with failure that really counts. If you accept that’s an opportunity, (or ‘crisortunity’ as I’ve learned from Homer Simpson), then you can use it as a platform to succeed upon while learning something about yourself in the process.

I recommend that everyone watch JK Rowling’s Harvard commencement speech on the importance of failure. It’s a lesson we all need a reminder of every once in a while.