Will Our Kids Be a New Species?

I think I might have to start a “Ted Videos I’m Obsessed With” series on my blog because I’ve found another presentation that’s really exciting.

Evolutionary biology has always been a favorite subject of mine and has definitely influenced my work. In this video, Juan Enriquez talks about how different species of humans co-existed in the past, and how we might be evolving along different paths in the present.

I highly recommend this video for anyone who is interested in sci-fi, fantasy, and those who occasionally like having their minds blown.

The Importance of Failure

At some point you’re going to fail. It’s inevitable, especially if you’re a writer.  It’s what you do with failure that really counts. If you accept that’s an opportunity, (or ‘crisortunity’ as I’ve learned from Homer Simpson), then you can use it as a platform to succeed upon while learning something about yourself in the process.

I recommend that everyone watch JK Rowling’s Harvard commencement speech on the importance of failure. It’s a lesson we all need a reminder of every once in a while.

Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries (and Great Novels?)

We’ve all heard the expression that the simplest idea/solution is usually the correct one. I think that definitely applies to the field of science but it also applies to writing. I find that the best stories, (even the ones that are very intricate), are simple at their core. *On a side note: I’ve touched upon this topic in my post about The Simpsons and Writing (see below).*

I’ll use one of my favorite series as an example: Harry Potter. *Spoiler Alert*: skip this paragraph if you haven’t read the book but want to! If you’ve read the series then you know that each of the 7 books has its own plot line with many twists, characters, Chekhov guns, and plot details. J.K. Rowling has created a very elaborate world with a million little parts that all add up into something that’s magical yet tangible–a world you’d actually want to be a part of. Who would pass up on a chance to go to Hogwarts, am I right? At the same time, it has an underlying plot line that permeates the entire story; one goal that all 7 books work towards. I think the entire story can be summed up with 2 statements: ‘Boy learns he’s a wizard and goes to wizarding school’ and ‘Hallows vs Horcruxes’. Interesting fact: J.K. Rowling has said that idea came to her as ‘boy who’s a wizard that doesn’t know he’s a wizard’. That one simple idea launched one of the most beloved and successful series of all time.

As with science, it’s important to remember that when it comes to writing, the simplest ideas are often the most powerful. That’s not to say that story can’t have depth and layers. It should. But it should also convey simple truths and revolve around one central idea. That one idea then becomes the foundation that the story and all its details rest upon. And anything that isn’t consistent or relevant to it should be cut out in the editing process.

I highly recommend this short and interesting TED Talk that elaborates on this topic wonderfully. Take a look and enjoy!

Creativity

This video is a TED Talk given by Elizabeth Gilbert, the author of Eat Pray Love, on nurturing creativity.  I think anyone who is or wants to be a writer should listen to it for the lesson it conveys, and even if you’re not a writer, it’s interesting nonetheless.

Enjoy!

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/elizabeth_gilbert_on_genius.html