Try Again, Fail Again, Fail Better

In the past couple of weeks, this quote has been on my mind often:

evertried

Being a writer, (or doing anything worthwhile and challenging), means that failure is inevitable. As I write the ninth version of Chapter One, it’s likely that I’ll add another notch to my failure belt. The thought of getting it wrong for a ninth time is a little unnerving and sometimes it feels like I’m running out space for notches.

And yet, this is exactly what needs to happen. Each time I fail, I improve as a writer. I learn something about the art that I didn’t know a day before, and my story is better for it.

So keep failing. Fail again and again. Getting better is worth it.

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Antagonists are Protagonists Too

Since I released Dark Rising to beta-readers back in September, I’ve gotten bits and pieces of feedback from those of you who picked up a copy. The one thing I keep hearing is how surprised everyone is that so much of the book is dedicated to Psi (the villain).

Most of the Young Adult books I’ve read focus on the hero and the challenges that he or she faces, but that didn’t seem like the right approach for me. I knew that it was really important to showcase the villain and give him just as much room in the story as my hero, Alexander, was given. I would go as far as to say that the first book of The Dark Matter Chronicles is more so about Psi than Alexander.

Why did I set up the book this way?

I believe that it is crucial to treat antagonists and all secondary characters as having just as much value as the protagonist. They are no less important and they’re certainly not meant to be plot devices or accessories for the main character.

The world doesn’t revolve around any one person, but each and every one of us is the protagonist in our own story. We don’t think of ourselves as existing only for someone else’s benefit. And that truth should be kept in mind when it comes to stories as well because if those characters were real people, then they would never consider themselves to be secondary characters–or even antagonists–in other peoples’ lives. No villain (real or fictional) thinks of him or herself as a villain.  Good versus evil isn’t that straightforward. I think the upcoming Wreck-it-Ralph does a good job of showing that, but in a much cuter and fluffier way than Dark Rising does.

From Psi’s perspective, he is the protagonist. He’s the hero. The Dark Matter Chronicles wouldn’t be a truthful story if I didn’t acknowledge that. And though you’ll get to know Alexander more in the second book, (I’m working on it, I swear), you’ll also get to see Psi’s evolution, along with that of Ezilie’s, Charon’s, and James’s, too.

So the next time you find yourself thinking of about how much you hate the bad guys in books, remember that just like Wreck-it-Ralph and Psi, bad guys are people too.

The Great Rules of Writing

As a writer, I think it’s important to work on your craft and strive to get better at it. I’ve learned a lot through the act of writing itself but sometimes it’s helpful to come across a list of rules like this:

Do not put statements in the negative form.
And don’t start sentences with a conjunction.
If you reread your work, you will find on rereading that a
great deal of repetition can be avoided by rereading and editing.
Never use a long word when a diminutive one will do.
Unqualified superlatives are the worst of all.
De-accession euphemisms.
If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is.
Avoid trendy locutions that sound flaky.
Last, but not least, avoid clichés like the plague.
~William Safire, “Great Rules of Writing”

If you don’t stumble upon these ‘rules’ somewhere, it’s likely you’ll discover them on your own. So far, I’ve found that they apply pretty consistently. The trick, of course, is to master the rules and then learn when to break them.

How to Come Up With Book Ideas

In the past few weeks, I’ve had a lot of conversations about how difficult it is to come up with book ideas. There’s a lot of advice out there by other writers and bloggers about how you can find inspiration, so only add to the info with a couple of points that work for me.

First, create mental space for a book idea. When the idea for The Dark Matter Chronicles came to me, I was actively looking for it. I spent time thinking about writing, about the sort of things I would want to write about, and I started to jot things down even if my thoughts seemed ridiculous. It took a while for the right idea to click. At that point, I had been thinking about writing and looking for an idea for several months. That being said, once you have the idea, you have to continue to give it attention, and actually sit down and write everyday. Once you get into that mindset and make it a habit, brainstorming new ideas gets easier.

Second, be an active learner. I get a lot of ideas from reading about things that I’m interested in or from watching documentaries, and these things aren’t always related to anything in my book. I find that learning for pleasure often leads me to new ideas and new ways of thinking.

There’s tons of tips out there that can help you start your first book, so take advantage of that! Writing requires time and work. But if you do happen to find a magical elf that sprinkles fairy dust on your work to make it better, then please send it my way.

Creativity

This video is a TED Talk given by Elizabeth Gilbert, the author of Eat Pray Love, on nurturing creativity.  I think anyone who is or wants to be a writer should listen to it for the lesson it conveys, and even if you’re not a writer, it’s interesting nonetheless.

Enjoy!

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/elizabeth_gilbert_on_genius.html